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Daily Current Affairs : 08-Feb-2020

Major Topics Covered :

  1. KNOW YOUR ‘UNPARLIAMENTARY’ EXPRESSION

  2. KAKA HATHRASI

  3. “REMDESIVIR” THE DRUG A CHINA COLLEGE WANTS TO PATENT

  4. BUYING OF PALM OIL FROM MALAYSIA

  5. EASE OF LIVING INDEX AND MUNICIPAL PERFORMANCE INDEX 2019 LAUNCHED

  6. DefExpo WITNESSES SIGNING OF OVER 200 MOUS, TOTS AND PRODUCT LAUNCHES

  7. ARMY GETS UPGRADED 155MM ARTILLERY GUN AT DEFEXPO

  8. WHY CANCER GENE MAP MATTERS?

  9. KERALA’S BAN ON CFL


KNOW YOUR ‘UNPARLIAMENTARY’ EXPRESSION

Why in news?

  • Two days of heated exchanges in Parliament have brought back recurring questions around “unparliamentary” speech and conduct.


Highlights:

  • Whatever an MP says is subject to the discipline of the Rules of Parliament, the “good sense” of Members, and the control of proceedings by the Speaker.

  • These checks ensure that MPs cannot use “defamatory or indecent or undignified or unparliamentary words” inside the House.

  • Article 105(2) of the Constitution lays down that “no Member of Parliament shall be liable to any proceedings in any court in respect of anything said or any vote given by him in Parliament or any committee thereof.”

  • But MPs do not enjoy the freedom to say whatever they want inside the House. Whatever an MP says is subject to the discipline of the Rules of Parliament.

  • Rule 380 (“Expunction”) of the Rules of Procedure and Conduct of Business in Lok Sabha says: “If the Speaker is of opinion that words have been used in debate which are defamatory or indecent or unparliamentary or undignified, the Speaker may, while exercising discretion order that such words be expunged from the proceedings of the House.”

  • Rule 381 says: “The portion of the proceedings of the House so expunged shall be marked by asterisks and an explanatory footnote shall be inserted in the proceedings as follows: ‘Expunged as ordered by the Chair’.”

  • For their reference and help, the Lok Sabha Secretariat has brought out a book titled ‘Unparliamentary Expressions.’

  • The list contains several words and expressions that would be considered rude or offensive.

Source: Indian Express



KAKA HATHRASI

Why in news?

  • Replying to the Motion of Thanks to the President’s address in Rajya Sabha on Thursday (February 6), Prime Minister Narendra Modi quoted Hindi poet Kaka Hathrasi to chide the Opposition for its “stagnation” and “unwillingness to move forward”.


Highlights:

  • Kaka Hathrasi is counted among the foremost poets of ‘haasya’ (humour) and ‘vyanga’ (satire) in Hindi literature.

  • Born Prabhulal Garg on September 18, 1906 (he died on September 18, 1995), he took the name ‘Kaka Hathrasi’ based on his hometown, Hathras in Uttar Pradesh, and on the popular character of a ‘Kaka’ (uncle) he had essayed in a play.

  • Apart from humour, he wrote on classical dance and music under the pen name ‘Vasant’. Kaka Hathrasi was also an accomplished painter.

  • In 1932, Kaka Hathrasi started Garg and Co., a publishing house dedicated to making Indian classical music and dance more accessible to the people. This was later renamed Sangeet Karyalaya, which is still active.

  • Born Prabhulal Garg , he took the name ‘Kaka Hathrasi’ based on his hometown, Hathras in Uttar Pradesh.

  • Hathrasi was honoured with the Padma Shri in 1985 for his contributions to Hindi literature.

Source: Indian Express



“REMDESIVIR” THE DRUG A CHINA COLLEGE WANTS TO PATENT

Why in news?

  • The Wuhan Institute of Virology, China Academy of Sciences, has filed for a patent on Remdesivir, an antiviral experimental drug from US biotechnology firm Gilead Sciences, which may help treat the novel coronavirus (nCoV-2019).


Highlights:

  • Remdesivir is an experimental drug and has not yet been licensed or approved anywhere globally. It is currently being developed for the treatment of Ebola virus infection.

  • Scientists are also testing the drug chloroquine as part of a drug discovery approach, where existing antiviral medicines are tested to see if they are effective against a new infection.

  • Remdesivir has demonstrated in vivo (experimentation using a whole living organism) and in vitro (activity performed in a controlled environment) activity in animal models against viral pathogens that cause MERS and SARS. These two diseases are also caused by coronaviruses structurally similar to the nCoV-2019.