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Daily Current Affairs : 15-Jan-2020

Major Topics Covered :

  1. A NATIONAL POLICY FOR TREATMENT OF RARE DISEASES

  2. WORLD FUTURE ENERGY SUMMIT- ABU DHABI

  3. ‘CLASSICAL’ LANGUAGE

  4. RAISINA DIALOGUE IN NEW DELHI

  5. COMPLEX VOLCANO- TAAL

  6. HIGH FLASH HIGH SPEED DIESEL (HFHSD) – IN 512

  7. CHELONOIDIS HOODENSIS OR THE GIANT TORTOISE SPECIES

  8. INTEGRATED ROAD ACCIDENT DATABASE

  9. AMENDMENT TO THE SEBI REGULATIONS


A NATIONAL POLICY FOR TREATMENT OF RARE DISEASES

Part of GS- Health


Why in news?

The Union Ministry of Health and Family Welfare published a national policy for treatment of rare diseases, listing 450 diseases as rare but not providing a detailed roadmap on treatment.


Highlights:

• The policy also intends to kick-start a registry of rare diseases that Indian Council of Medical Research will maintain.

• In India, Haemophilia, Thalassemia, Sickle cell anaemia and Primary Immuno Deficiency in children, auto-immune diseases, Lysosomal storage disorders such as Pompe disease and Gaucher’s disease are in the rare diseases list.

• The latest policy creates three categories of rare diseases — diseases requiring one-time curative treatment, diseases which need long-term treatment but the cost is low, and diseases that require life-long treatment and the cost is high.

• The policy states that the Centre will provide assistance of Rs 15 lakh to patients suffering from rare diseases that require one-time curative treatment under the Rashtriya Arogya Nidhi scheme.

• The treatment is limited to beneficiaries of Pradhan Mantri Jan Arogya Yojana.

• Some diseases in this category are osteopetrosis, immune deficiency disorders and Lysosomal Storage Disorders.

• According to Health Ministry, about 95 per cent rare diseases have no approved treatment. “Less than one in 10 patients receives disease-specific treatment,” the policy states.

• The Centre first prepared such a policy in 2017, but appointed a committee in 2018 to review it.

• The policy has recommended that state governments support patients belonging to the second category of diseases that include Phenylketonuria and Galactosemia, among others.

• It also recommends crowd funding as a source to fund treatment of rare diseases and advises hospitals to report such cases on digital platforms to gather funds.

• “The policy is at least beginning of a discussion on rare diseases in the country. But last time they announced a Rs 100-crore corpus fund, now there is no budget. There is no clarity of Centre and State responsibilities and on category III patients,” said Prassana Shirol, founder of Organisation for Rare diseases India.


Source: PIB WORLD



FUTURE ENERGY SUMMIT- ABU DHABI

Part of GS- 2 IR


Why in news?

  • The World Future Energy Summit will begin on 13th January in Abu Dhabi. 33,500 participants from 170 countries and 800 specialist exhibitors are expected to attend the four-day annual event.


Highlights:

• The theme for this year's summit is "Rethinking Global Consumption, Production, and Investment." World Future Energy Summit is the Middle East’s largest future energy and sustainability event.

• The event is starting to set an example for best practice, supporting the circular economy through recycling, and acting to remove single-use plastics from the event.

• Also held alongside the World Future Energy Summit are the Climate Innovations Exchange, ‘CLIX’ for short and the Future Sustainability Summit.

• The 2020 edition includes exhibition and forum programmes across five main pillars: energy, solar, water, waste and smart cities, hosting an unrivalled gathering of top-level government and business leaders.

• The event will showcase 42 of the world’s most disruptive innovations, selected from 1,402 global submissions from 128 countries, related to the future of energy, food, agriculture and sustainability in space.

World future energy summit:

• The World Future Energy Summit (WFES) is an annual event, dedicated to advancing future energy, energy efficiency and clean technologies.

• Held under the patronage of Sheikh Mohammed Bin Zayed Al Nahyan, Crown Prince of Abu Dhabi and Deputy Supreme Commander of the UAE Armed Forces, WFES includes a summit, an exhibition, the Project Village, Round Table Discussions, the Young Future Energy Leaders program, corporate meetings and social events.


Source: The Hindu



‘CLASSICAL’ LANGUAGE

Part of GS- 1 A&C


Why in news?

On 11th-13 Jan, the 93rd edition of the Akhil Bharatiya Marathi Sahitya Sammelan, a resolution was passed demanding the declaration of Marathi as a ‘Classical’ language, Loksatta reported. In many of its conventions in the past, the body has made this demand.


Highlights:

• The Sammelan, an annual conference of Marathi writers, was started in 1878, and over the years has been headed by leading Marathi intellectuals, including Justice Mahadev Govind Ranade, Maharaja Sayajirao Gaekwad III of Baroda, and Prahlad Keshav “Acharya” Atre.

• This year’s conference was presided over by litterateur, environmentalist, and Catholic priest Francis D’Britto, the first Christian to do so in history. How Classical Language Declared?

1. According to information provided by the Ministry of Culture in the Rajya Sabha in February

2014, the guidelines for declaring a language as ‘Classical’ are: 2. High antiquity of its early texts/recorded history over a period of 1500-2000 years; 3. A body of ancient literature/texts, which is considered a valuable heritage by generations of

speakers; 4. The literary tradition be original and not borrowed from another speech community; 5. The classical language and literature being distinct from modern, there may also be a

discontinuity between the classical language and its later forms or its offshoots.


What are ‘Classical’ languages in India, and how are they classified?

➢ Currently, six languages enjoy the ‘Classical’ status: ➢ Tamil (declared in 2004), ➢ Sanskrit (2005), ➢ Kannada (2008), ➢ Telugu (2008), ➢ Malayalam (2013), and ➢ Odia (2014).


How are the Classical languages promoted? The Human Resource and Development Ministry in its reply to a starred question in the Lok Sabha in July 2014 noted the benefits it provides once a language is notified as a Classical language:

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Two major annual international awards for scholars of eminence in classical Indian languages

A Centre of Excellence for studies in Classical Languages is set up

The University Grants Commission is requested to create, to start with at least in the Central Universities, a certain number of Professional Chairs for the Classical Languages so declared.”

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In a 2019 Lok Sabha reply, the Ministry of Culture listed the institutions that have been dedicated to Classical languages.

Sanskrit: Rashtriya Sanskrit Sansthan, New Delhi; Maharishi Sandipani Rashtriya Ved Vidya Pratishthan, Ujjain; Rashtriya Sanskrit Vidyapeetha, Tirupati; and Sri Lal Bahadur Shastri Rashtriya Sanskrit Vidyapeeth, New Delhi

Telugu and Kannada: Centres of Excellence for Studies in the respective languages at the Central Institute of Indian Languages (CIIL) established by the HRD Ministry in 2011.

Tamil: Central Institute of Classical Tamil (CICT), Chennai


Source: Indian Express



RAISINA DIALOGUE IN NEW DELHI