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Daily Current Affairs : 17-Dec-2019

Major Topics Covered :

  1. ARTICLE 6 OF THE PARIS AGREEMENT (CARBON MARKETS)

  2. RIGHT TO PROTEST

  3. RIGHT TO PROTEST II

  4. DELHI DIALOGUE

  5. CROWN ACT

  6. NEFT TRANSACTIONS NOW AVAILABLE (NEFT) 24X7

  7. SEXED SEMEN

  8. MOBILE NUMBER PORTABILITY GOING TO BE FAST, SIMPLE FROM DEC 16

  9. SHANMUGA SUBRAMANIAN

  10. DSC PRIZE FOR SOUTH ASIAN LITERATURE



ARTICLE 6 OF THE PARIS AGREEMENT (CARBON MARKETS)

Part of GS-3 Environment


Why in news?


Negotiators at the Madrid climate talks finally threw up their hands on the contentious issue of setting up a new carbon market under the Paris Agreement.


Highlights:

  • Carbon markets allow the buying and selling of emission reductions in the form of carbon credits, and enable countries struggling to meet their climate targets to buy these credits from countries that are in a position to reduce their emissions beyond their own targets.

  • Such a carbon market existed under the 1997 Kyoto Protocol as well but that regime is coming to an end next year.

  • The current negotiations are about creating a similar market under the successor Paris Agreement regime.

Article 6 of Paris agreement:

  • The provisions relating to setting up a new carbon market are described in Article 6 of the Paris Agreement.

  • These provisions allow for two different approaches of carbon trading.

  • Article 6.2 enables bilateral arrangements for transfer of emissions reductions, while ensuring that they do not double-count the reductions.

  • Article 6.4 talks about a wider carbon market in which reductions can be bought and sold by anyone.

  • Article 6.8 provides for making ‘non-market approaches’ available to countries to achieve targets.

  • They could include any cooperative action, like collaboration on climate policy or common taxation, that are not market-based.

Disagreement:

  • The big disagreement is over the transition of unsold carbon credits from the Kyoto regime to the new market.

  • Countries like India, China and Brazil want their unsold carbon credits to be valid in the new market while the developed countries are opposing it on the ground that many of these credits were bogus and did not represent actual emission reductions.


Source : The Hindu


RIGHT TO PROTEST

Part of GS-2 Polity and Governance


Why in news?


The police action in Delhi's Jamia Millia Islamia, where the police entered the campus and employed force against students, is being widely criticised.


Highlights: IN THE CONSTITUTION


The right to protest peacefully is guaranteed by the Constitution of India.

Articles 19(1)(a) and 19(1)(b) give to all citizens the right to freedom of speech and expression, and to assemble peaceably and without arms.


However, under Articles 19(2) and 19(3), the right to freedom of speech is subject to “reasonable restrictions in the interests of the sovereignty and integrity of India, the security of the State, friendly relations with foreign States, public order, decency or morality or in relation to contempt of court, defamation or incitement to an offence”.


IN THE CrPC AND IPC


The legal provisions and avenue available to police for handling agitations, protests, and unlawful assemblies are covered by the Code of Criminal Procedure (CrPC), 1973, the Indian Penal Code (IPC), 1860, and The Police Act, 1861.


The CrPC’s Sections 129-132 deal with “Dispersal of assembly by use of civil force”, use of the armed forces in situations of civil unrest, and protection against prosecution for acts done under these sections.


Under CrPC Section 129, “any Executive Magistrate or officer in charge of a police station may command any unlawful assembly, or any assembly of five or more persons likely to cause a disturbance of the public peace, to disperse; and it shall thereupon be the duty of the members of such assembly to disperse accordingly”.


Source: Indian Express


RIGHT TO PROTEST II

Part of GS-2 Polity and Governance


Why in news?


While agreeing to hear petitions on alleged police excesses on students in Jamia Millia Islamia and Aligarh Muslim University, a Supreme Court Bench headed by Chief Justice of India S A Bobde on Monday expressed displeasure over rioting and destruction of public property.


The CJI said the protesters were free to take to the streets, but if they did, they would not be heard by the court.


Highlights:


The Prevention of Damage to Public Property Act, 1984 punishes anyone “who commits mischief by doing any act in respect of any public property” with a jail term of up to five years and a fine or both.


Public property under this Act includes “any building, installation or other property used in connection with the production, distribution or supply of water, light, power or energy; any oil installation; any sewage works; any mine or factory; any means of public transportation or of telecommunications, or any building, installation or other property used in connection therewith”.


Provisions of this law can be coupled with those under the Indian Penal Code.